Reflecting on my Sophomore Year

I stood in the middle of my room in Lawrinson Hall, surrounded by boxes and bins filled with things that had made the space my own during the past school year. I found myself at a loss for words–how could the year have passed so quickly? It seemed as if it was just yesterday that I had arrived back on campus, eager to renew old friendships, forge new ones, and savor each moment of my ever-shortening college career. All of my things had just been unpacked and put in their place; and now I had to undo all of my hard work. The pace at which time passed away seemed almost unjust–what was fair about nine months of college going by in what seemed like mere days?

In college, unpacking and settling in your room can be one of the most exciting (and exhausting) parts of beginning a new school year. It represents a new start–a new year filled with incredible experiences and memories. Making your room “just so” always gives it a feeling of home and a sense that you belong there. The anticipation of what lies ahead is a truly exciting feeling. On the other hand, packing and moving out represents almost the opposite. Moving out signals that the relaxation of summer lies just ahead, but is also a bittersweet reminder of the school year that has become just another memory. And although the promise of another school year always exists in the back of your mind, the cold, hard truth that graduation looms another year closer can be painful.

As I waited for the arrival of my parents, I sat in my desk chair, reminiscing about the incredible year I’d had at Syracuse. Marching band provided me with many new friendships, and the opportunity to play great music and witness some exciting football games from a unique perspective. I continued to see academic success in the first semester, and it was overall a very enjoyable (albeit fast) one. The second semester provided me with opportunities that few ever have in their lifetime. I was able to travel with our men’s basketball team to all postseason games as part of the Sour Sitrus Society pep band. The trips we made–to New York, Pittsburgh, and Boston–were incredible. I saw areas of the country I’d never seen before, and I spent a lot of time with some pretty great people. I realized that over the past year, I’d done a lot of maturing, and that I’d grown a lot as a person. The memories I cling to from the past year are so valuable to me–they take me back to those wonderful days gone by.

Even though my sophomore year at Syracuse was incredibly busy, it went much faster than my first at the University. Before I went off to school, many of the adults in my life told me to enjoy every moment of my college experience, because it only happened once, and it went by quickly. Now, I knew that my time at Syracuse was a one-shot deal, but I doubted that time would fly. Four years of high school seemed to go at a plodding pace–it was as if I was stuck in the doldrums, and there was no escape. Those four years dragged on at a snail’s pace. How could four years of college possibly go any faster than that? And as a I look back on the two years I’ve completed, I know that those people were right to give me that advice. Over the course of my final two years at Syracuse, I will not take one moment or friendship for granted, because before I realize it, it’ll all be over.

As I write this, I find myself eagerly awaiting the arrival of the next school year. I’ve been home for only three weeks, and I absolutely love being home. It is wonderful to be able to spend so much time with my family and friends, and get away from the hectic pace of college. But this coming fall, another amazing opportunity awaits me. In late April, I was appointed as one of the Drum Majors of the SU Marching Band, and I am already anxious to get to work. I excitedly await the experiences that lie ahead for me–in band, in my new apartment with one of my best friends, and with all my wonderful friends who make my college experience awesome.

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